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Dump Truck Crash Kills One, Injures Four

A St. Charles Man was killed in a Missouri head-on trucking accident on April 13, 2011 at 6:18am. Missourians from O’Fallon, Troy and St. Charles were additionally injured in the Missouri truck accident.

A 2006 Peterbilt Dump Truck was driven by Bradley J. Geeding, 30, of Troy, Missouri on northbound Route Z, just south of Stealey Road. Geeding failed to negotiate a curve and crossed the centerline. The dump truck slammed into a 1994 Plymouth Sundance, causing a truck accident. Juan C. Avila-Hernandes, 24, of O’Fallon, Missouri was the driver of the Plymouth. The small car was totaled in the Missouri dump truck accident.

Alfredo T. Robles, 67, of St. Charles, Missouri was killed in the St. Charles County truck accident. Robles was an occupant of Avila-Hernandes’s car. St. Charles County EMS personnel pronounced Robles dead at the scene of the accident at 6:30pm. His next of kin was notified.

Avila-Hernandes suffered from moderate injuries. He was transported to St. Joseph’s Center East. Abraham S. Perez and Leonel C. Ortiz, both occupants in Avila-Hernandes’s vehicle, suffered minor injuries in the accident. They were both transported by St. Charles County Ambulance to St Joseph’s Hospital West. Geeding sustained minor injuries and was transported to St. Joseph’s Hospital West. No charges were reported after an investigation into the Missouri dump truck crash by the Commercial Motor Vehicle Enforcement Team and the Major Crash Team.

According to the Department of Transportation, thousands of Americans are killed in trucking accidents each year. 98% of deaths in fatal trucking accidents occur to non-commercial drivers, passengers, and pedestrians on the road. Only 2% of fatalities in trucking accidents occur to the commercial driver. Dump trucks, semis, and tractor trailers are so massive that seemingly slight errors in the operation, the maintenance, and the manufacturing of commercial trucks may cause extensive damage.

Commercial truck manufacturers have launched truck recalls because of safety issues. Peterbilt and Kenworth recalled over 5,000 trucks because a fire may result from degradation in a combustion tube. Peterbilt and Kenworth additionally recalled over 4,500 trucks because of a different potential fire hazard. An oil module centrifugal filter cap may loosen and come off, discharging oil and increasing the likelihood of a fire. The danger of these degraded combustion tubes and loose caps highlight how the negligent manufacturing of commercial trucks affect Missouri highway safety. A single loose cap may make truck accidents fiery accidents.