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Mt. Vernon Man Injured in Taney County Missouri Dump Truck Accident

Christopher M. Young of Mt. Vernon, Missouri was injured in a Taney County Missouri dump truck accident on June 23, 2011 at 5:35pm. The Missouri truck accident happened on Highway 76 near Bradleyville, Missouri.

The Missouri dump truck accident occurred when Young crossed the centerline of the roadway while driving a 1994 Freightliner Dump Truck. The dump truck nearly crashed head-on into a 1988 GMC Jimmy driven by Tammy L. Baird of Bradleyville, Missouri. Baird’s GMC was wrecked in the accident. The dump truck sustained moderate damage. Young was transported to Cox South Hospital in Springfield, Missouri for medical treatment.

Missouri truck driver fatigue is a serious problem afflicting the nation’s highways. According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), the truck accident injuries of 20,000 accident victims are caused by truck driver fatigue. Fatigued drivers increase the risk of Missouri truck accidents. Fatigued truck drivers are more likely to make dangerous mistakes like crossing the centerline into oncoming traffic. The devastating consequences of Missouri truck driver fatigue have encouraged the FMCSA to promulgate hours-of-service regulations.

Hours-of-service regulations limit how long truck drivers may operate commercial motor vehicles. Hours-of-service rules promote safety by preventing trucking companies from pressuring truck drivers to operate without enough sleep. The FMCSA created the regulations with an eye on scientific studies about sleep deprivation and its effects. The FMCSA worked with organizations such as the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies to best design hours-of-service regulations.

Hours-of-service regulations apply to large vehicles used as a part of a business in interstate commerce. The regulations allow truck drivers to operate property-carrying commercial motor vehicles for a maximum of 11 hours after 10 consecutive hours off duty. Truck drivers are not allowed to drive after 60/70 hours on duty in 7/8 days. The 7/8 day period may be restarted if the truck driver takes 34 hours or more off duty. If the truck drivers utilize the sleeper berth provision, the truck drivers must spend at least 8 hours in the sleeper berth. Hours-of-service rules are federal motor carrier regulations that keep the public safe from fatigued truck drivers.