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Three Vehicle Trucking Accident Injures Two

Two men were sent to the hospital for medical treatment after a Henry County trucking accident on May 10, 2011. The Missouri truck accident occurred on MO-13 at 11:15am.

Randy E. Johnston of Springfield, Missouri swerved in a 2007 Kenworth tractor trailer on MO-13, just north of MO-52. Johnston crashed into the left rear of the 1998 Chevrolet driven by Bill L. Kammerich of Chilhowee, Missouri. Johnston’s tractor trailer continued to slam into the whole left side of Kammerich’s Chevrolet after the initial impact. Johnston swerved away from the Chevrolet and began to slide. The trailer of the Kenworth then crashed into a Ford 555 Model Tractor driven William F. Stewart of Clinton, Missouri. The vehicles blocked northbound MO-13 when they came to rest.

The Missouri State Highway Patrol reported that two people were injured in the Missouri tractor trailer accident. William F. Stewart, 73, of Clinton suffered serious injuries. He did not wear safety device during the accident, but tractors are exempt from seat belt requirements. Billy L. Kammerich, 57, of Chilhowee suffered moderate injuries. He wore a safe device during the accident. Both men were taken to Golden Valley Memorial Hospital by Golden Valley E.M.S. There were no reported injuries for Johnston.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is an independent agency of the federal government that makes safety recommendations and monitors the progress of safety regulations. According to the NTSB, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is failing to acceptably respond to highway safety recommendations. For example, the FMCSA has not enacted a proposal that would prevent trucking companies from operating if they use tractor trailers with mechanical problems on the roads. When trucking companies put unsafe vehicles on the road, they negligently endanger the public.

Trucking company negligence is a common Missouri truck accident cause. Trucking companies often sacrifice public safety for their profitability. Trucking companies may put poorly maintained vehicles on the road or hire poorly trained truck drivers. Sometimes, trucking companies will even use defective vehicles. The negligent behavior of trucking companies increases the likelihood of truck accident injuries.