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Young Woman Killed In County Truck Crash

Grace E. Stanton of Springfield, Missouri was killed in St. Clair County Missouri trucking accident on May 21, 2011 at 11:56am. The Missouri truck accident occurred at the intersection of MO-13 and 3rd Street in Lowry City, Missouri.

Stanton drove a 2004 Oldsmobile Alero on MO-13. Truck driver Chad D. Long of Ash Grove, Missouri drove a 2007 International Tractor directly into her path. Stanton’s vehicle crashed into the International’s trailer. Stanton’s Oldsmobile was totaled in the accident, while the tractor trailer sustained only minor damage.

Stanton and occupant Joshua A. Thompson of Brookline, Missouri were injured in the Missouri truck accident. Both were taken to Golden Valley Hospital at Clinton, Missouri by ambulance. Thompson sustained moderate injuries. The accident was fatal for Stanton. She was pronounced in the hospital by Dr. William Comporon at 1:20pm. Her next of kin has been notified by the authorities. Truck driver Chad D. Long was tested for alcohol as required by law.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is the agency of the federal government that promulgates safety regulations to decrease the occurrence of Missouri fatal truck accidents. According to the FMCSA’s motor carrier regulations, commercial drivers involved in fatal accidents must be tested for drugs and alcohol. Alcohol tests must be performed within eight hours of the accident. Drug tests must be performed within 32 hours. The FMCSA requires that the drug tests monitor five categories of controlled substances – marijuana, cocaine, opiates, amphetamines and methamphetamines, and phencyclidine (PCP). Those controlled substances have been found to negatively affect driving ability.

If a truck driver tests positive for drugs or alcohol, the trucker cannot legally operate a commercial motor vehicle on public roadways. The driver has to complete a “return-to-duty” process before being able to operate any commercial motor vehicle. The “return-to-duty” process may result in lengthy periods of unemployment. Truck drivers with a history of drug and alcohol use while driving often have difficulty finding another job. Even after the “return-to-duty” process is completed, follow-up drug testing adds additional financial stress to the truck driver. The FMCSA regulations deter truckers from driving roadways while under the influence of drugs and alcohol.